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2018 Kia Stinger & 2019 Kia Sorento Snow Driving – Video

2018 Kia Stinger & 2019 Kia Sorento Snow Driving – Video

The 2.0-liter twin-scroll turbocharged four-cylinder Theta II engine produces 255 horsepower8b at 6,200 rpm with 260 lb.-ft. of maximum torque available from 1,400 – 4,000 rpm, propelling the Stinger from 0-60 mph in just 5.9 seconds8. Performance credentials are further enhanced through the available 3.3-liter twin-turbo V6 Lambda II engine, which produces 365 horsepower8b at 6,000 rpm and offers 376 lb.-ft. of torque from 1,350 – 4,500 rpm. With more power on tap than the Audi S5 Sportback, BMW 440i Gran Coupe, and Infiniti Q509, the Stinger GT is positioned to be a worthy challenger to the competition. As such, the Stinger GT accelerates to 60 mph in 4.7 seconds10, quicker than the six-cylinder Porsche Panamera11. Pushing the twin turbocharged V6 to its full potential will allow the Stinger GT to achieve a governed top speed of 167 mph12.

The Stinger features an in-house designed second-generation eight-speed rear-drive automatic transmission. More typically found in aviation- and racing-engine applications, the transmission features Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter on the 2.0L to help reduce torsional vibrations through the drivetrain and has been designed with an oil cooler to more efficiently handle heat build-up. Drivers can let the gearbox manage shifts on its own or may selectively run through the gears via paddle shifters mounted aft of the steering wheel. As with the suspension and steering, up to five different shift patterns may be selected through the vehicle’s electronic drive-mode system. Throttle mapping is also adjusted accordingly.

Recognizing that passionate drivers may not always reside in optimal climes, the Stinger is Kia’s first sedan available with rear- or all-wheel drive. Rear-wheel biased for optimal control in the wet or dry, the AWD system features a new Dynamic Torque Vectoring Control system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the appropriate wheels to help maintain course in a variety of adverse conditions. The system freely distributes torque between the front and rear wheels and also can send power from side to side, depending on driving conditions. Should the system detect slippage, power is seamlessly directed towards the front or rear wheels, depending on the driving situation. Up to 50 percent of torque can be distributed to the front wheels, and in Sport mode up to 80 percent of the power can be routed to the rear wheels. Rear-drive GT2 models get the benefit of an available multi-plate limited slip differential to help evenly distribute power through the rear wheels and enhance directional stability.

A choice of alloy wheels and tires is also offered. The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder models ride on 225/45R-18 performance all-season tires while the 3.3-liter V6 is shod with staggered ultra-high performance Michelin Pilot Sport 4 tires that have been specifically engineered and tuned for the Stinger; 225/40R-19 in front and 255/35R-19 at the rear.

Engineers subjected the Stinger to a variety of high-speed braking tests, including continuous runs down the infamous Grossglockner High Alpine Road in the Austrian Alps for constant downhill brake testing. The Stinger GT’s stopping power comes from standard high-performance Brembo®13 disc brakes featuring quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers, which were subjected to temperatures of more than 1,400 degrees Fahrenheit during their development. The lightweight monobloc all-aluminum calipers reduce unsprung weight and are coupled with large diameter brake discs (13.8-in. front and 13.4-in. rear) that quickly dissipate heat and deliver extremely short stopping distances.


The spirited front- or all-wheel drive experience is brought to life with a choice of two proven engines, including a 2.4-liter inline-4 GDI or a 3.3-liter V6 GDI. For MY19, the 2.0-liter turbo I-4 will no longer be offered as part of Sorento’s powertrain strategy. However, a new diesel engine with the latest emission controls is currently under development and more information is forthcoming.

The carryover 2.4-liter engine is mated to a revised and more efficient electronically controlled six-speed automatic gearbox featuring Sportmatic® shifting and delivers a capable 185 horsepower. The Sorento’s familiar V6 brings with it a stampede of 290 horses while connecting to a new 8-speed automatic transmission shared with the brand’s Cadenza premium sedan. The result is a noticeably smoother and more seamless interaction between engine and transmission. This pairing also maintains Sorento’s towing capacity at 5,000 lbs when equipped with AWD.

To achieve a more intuitive driving experience, Sorento replaces the former Drive Mode Select setup with the new Smart Shift & Drive feature across all trim levels. This enhancement automatically activates the optimum drive mode – Eco, Sport or Smart – based on driving style or may be set by driver preference.

Kia’s suite of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) is now standard on Sorento EX trims and higher. In addition to Forward Collision Warning System (FCWS)1, Smart Cruise Control (SCC)1, Blind Spot Detection (BSD)1, Rear Cross Traffic Alert1 and Surround View Monitor (SVM)1, Sorento now offers Driver Attention Warning (DAW)4 and Lane Keeping Assist (LKA).1 DAW is designed to detect when driver concentration has waned by monitoring vehicle and driving behavior and, then, if it detects driver fatigue or inattentive driving practices, issues visual and audible warnings, including a coffee cup icon in the instrument cluster, to encourage the driver to take a break.” LKA helps alerts the driver and can even steer the vehicle back to its original position should the system detect the vehicle drifting out of its lane.

In addition, all Sorento models continue to offer standard active safety features such as Electronic Stability Control (ESC)15, Traction Control System (TCS)15, Brake Assist System (BAS)15, Hill-start Assist Control (HAC)15, Electronic Brake Force Distribution (EBD)15 and Antilock Braking System (ABS)15. Additional technologies such as Roll Over Mitigation (ROM)15 and Cornering Brake Control (CBC)15 on AWD models are standard equipment for improved dynamic control.

The core of the 2019 Sorento remains its rigid structure, with 53 percent of the unit-body consisting of advanced high-strength steel. Liberal application of industrial strength adhesives, the use of dual-seal lip joints as well as laser and large diameter welding techniques combine to make the Sorento solid and strong.

The Sorento’s well-proven suspension geometry and responsive steering system provide a quick and nimble behind-the-wheel feel. Ride and handling are optimized with the application of an “H” shaped subframe, four-point bushing mountings, and Hydraulic Rebound Stopper-type shock absorbers. And vertically mounted rear shocks contribute to a comfortable ride no matter what the driving conditions. The available Rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) features direct mounting of the electric motor on the steering rack, enhancing steering response and improving handling.

Sorento continues to offer an advanced AWD system designed to automatically route power to the wheel with the most traction. When conditions call for more sure-footed capability, the 4WD Lock Mode splits engine power evenly between the front and rear drive shafts. The system also provides drivers the added stability of Torque Vector Cornering Control (TVCC).15 The TVCC system is activated when yaw and steering sensors detect unwanted understeer.

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