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2018 Honda Motorcycles at EICMA – Video

2018 Honda Motorcycles at EICMA – Video

The CB1000R heads a trio of new naked machines with a unique new identity developed under a design theme of ‘Neo Sports Café’. The new styling language is modern and minimalist, mixing sports naked and café racer inspirations with head-turning results. While every single part has been chosen with its aesthetic effect in mind, the CB1000R lacks nothing in performance and specification: a 12kg weight reduction and 15kW power up compared to the previous generation of CB1000R means a 20% improvement in power to weight ratio. The multiple riding modes with different combinations of Power, Engine Braking and Honda Selectable Torque Control run on a new state-of-the-art Throttle By Wire engine management system.

Sharing the new look are two machines for riders at an earlier stage of their motorcycle career. The CB300R and CB125R are both built for fun riding, with light weight and free-revving engines. But they also boast high specification 41mm USD forks, preload adjustable rear suspension, radial-mount 4-piston front brake calipers and several other features more usually found on much larger machines such as LCD instrument display, LED lighting and IMU-based ABS system.


 The new GL1800 Gold Wing makes its European debut at the 2017 EICMA show. Synonymous with long range comfort, luxury and quality for over 40 years, the new Gold Wing has been redesigned from the wheels up, to be sharper, lighter and more compact. The monumental flat six-cylinder engine now has 4-valves per cylinder and comes equipped with Throttle By Wire, 4 riding modes, Honda Selectable Torque Control and a Hill Start Assist function. The new chassis features an aluminium beam frame, double wishbone front suspension and single-sided Pro-Arm.

The Gold Wing remains the only motorcycle to offer an air bag as an option, and the new standard-fit Apple CarPlay is another motorcycling first. An entirely new, third generation of Honda’s unique Dual Clutch Transmission – with seven speeds – will also be available, and is the perfect match for the Gold Wing’s continent-crossing capabilities.


The new ‘Adventure Sports’ version of the CRF1000L Africa Twin marks the 30th anniversary of the arrival in Europe of one of motorcycling’s most celebrated names. Bearing the same tricolore paint scheme as the original, the new model is built to go even further on both on-road and off-road adventure. It has a 5.4 litre bigger fuel tank than the CRF1000L Africa Twin itself, plus longer travel suspension, higher riding position and ground clearance, heated grips, extra-large skid plate and extended fairing with protective cowl bar. It also shares the extensive updates given to the Africa Twin, which include Throttle By Wire engine management with four riding modes, expanded Honda Selectable Torque Control parameters, and revised intake and exhaust for stronger mid-range response.



The idea for the Monkey Concept Version was to take the classic-looking lines of the original Honda Monkey and give them a fresh, modern twist. For those who are not familiar with Honda’s Monkey range of bikes, it is a range of mini bikes, which is said to take the name monkey, because a person riding the same looks like a monkey perched on a mini-bike.

Honda’s Super Cub is one of the most important mobility devices yet conceived. The dirt-simple, ingeniously engineered machine is the bestselling motorcycle of all time, having been in continuous production since 1958. Sold here in America as the 50 and the Passport because Piper already held the “Super Cub” trademark for its PA-18 airplane, the Super Cub was the product being touted in the famed “You meet the nicest people on a Honda” ad campaign. What’s more, it’s the machine that broke Japanese motorcycles in America—which ultimately led to the collapse of the British bike industry and nearly took out Harley-Davidson in the process. Honda’s desire to celebrate it is obvious.

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